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International Children´s Book Day

Since 1967, on or around Hans Christian Andersen´s birthday, 2 April, International Children´s Book Day (ICBD) is celebrated to inspire a love of reading and to call attention to children´s books.

Each year a different national section of IBBY has the opportunity to be the international sponsor of ICBD. It decides upon a theme and invites a prominent author from the host country to write a message to the children of the world and a well-known illustrator to design a poster. This year the host country is Estonia, the message was written by Aino Pervik, and the poster was created by Juri Mildebertt. These materials are used in different ways to promote books and reading. Many IBBY sections promote ICBD through the media and organize activities in schools and public libraries. Often ICBD is linked to celebrations around children´s books and other special events that may include encounters with authors and illustrators, writing competitions, or announcements of book awards.

Bookjoy Around the World: ICBD Resource blog

Celebrate International Children´s Book Day
USBBY invites you to help celebrate International Children´s Book Day with the children you love in your home, classroom, or library, using ideas and materials from colleagues around the world, and to share your own ideas via the ICBD Creative Ideas Form below.


Name: Laurel Heger (laurelheger@yahoo.com)

Institution: Libraries and or field trips to Community Colleges by 3-6 graders

Title of proposed program: Inspiring a Passion for Young Readers

Audience: Grades 3-6

Books used:
Thumbelina By Hans Christian Anderson and over 150 fairy tales and stories by Hans Christian Anderson.

Materials needed:
For the 1952 musical film, Hans Christian Andersen (film, lap top computer, posters for the event designed by college students and materials to design finger puppets of the characters in the story

Brief outline of program or event:
Children´s literature students from Community colleges would read Thumbelina along with an enactment using finger puppets, as portrayed in the 1952 movie with Danny Kaye A party theme with the sound/music playing I´m Hans Christian Anderson.


Name: jackie morris (morris.jackie49@yahoo.com)

Institution: self

Title of proposed program: children

Audience: niece and friends grandkids

Books used:
coloring books reading books for children

Materials needed:
any children learning items

Brief outline of program or event:
i save up items and give to children


Name: Eva B. Ramos (neleva@msn.com)

Institution: Rainbows Foundation

Title of proposed program: The Children of the Philippines Celebrating the Joy of Reading

Audience: Children, Educators, Librarians, Volunteers

Books used:
The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Handa's Surprise, Crow Boy, Each Kindness, Flat Stanley, Goodnight Moon, Chicken Soup with Rice, The House that Jack Built

Materials needed:
Video clips, pictures, powerpoint presentation

Brief outline of program or event:
Present narrative and demonstrative materials on the establishment of libraries in public elementary schools, doing read alouds to elementary school students with extension activities, reading comprehension classes to older high school students and workshop on the magic and values of children´s literature


Name: Kelly Grimmett (kgrimmett@friendsseminary.org)

Institution: Friends Seminary

Title of proposed program: Peace Stories from throughout the World

Audience: K-3

Books used:
Many books!

Materials needed:
Peace Stories Google Map http://goo.gl/maps/M7AvU

Brief outline of program or event:
Friends Seminary Service Learning Director, Leitzel Schoen, and Librarian Kelly Grimmett worked with Kindergarden and first grade students to create this resource as a service to the Lower School community during our annual celebration of Peace Week. This resource can work equally well as a basis for celebrating International Children´s Book Day. Using the Google map (http://goo.gl/maps/M7AvU) families are invited to read these stories and to consider using them as a launching point for a family discussion about peace and nonviolent communication. Click on each marker on the map to learn about the plot, access online resources, and receive a peace query to guide a family in reflection.


Name: Francois Brillon (fbrillon@gmail.com)

Institution: millionsofstories.wordpress.com

Title of proposed program: Millions of Stories

Audience: Children of all ages

Books used:
the most diverse and maximum amount of children books possible (see outline of program event for details)

Materials needed:
Parents, Children, Storytellers, fun, love, passion, books.

Brief outline of program or event:
Hi, I think promoting the Children´s Book Day would be wonderfully achieved by getting a lots of books lovers and storytelling to fulfill a spectacular and unifying storytelling goal, i.e. telling more than 1 million of stories to children all around the world! This would be an event like a Teleton, but not for collecting money. The sole and only purpose of this event would be to read stories to a lot of children around the world and make them happy about it. :-) This is the goal I'm pursuing at http://millionsofstories.wordpress.com Francois


Name: Lucine Kasbarian (USBBY member) (editor@lucinekasbarian.com)

Institution: Armenian Library and Museum of America (ALMA)

Title of proposed program: Quo vadis, multicultural books?

Audience: all ages and backgrounds

Books used:
Who are the Armenians? by Susan Pattie and editors (Armenian Institute Press) Treasured Objects by Susan Pattie and editors (Armenian Institute Press) Armenia: A Rugged Land, an Enduring People by Lucine Kasbarian (Dillon Press/Simon & Schuster) The Greedy Sparrow: An Armenian Tale by Lucine Kasbarian (Marshall Cavendish/Amazon Children's Books) Dzirani Anoush by Alik Arzoumanian (Kirk Mirk Books) Others to be announced

Materials needed:
ALMA would be honored to receive USBBY financial aid and/or advice about organizations who could provide it so that we may launch this initiative. During these events, we would be delighted to circulate USBBY materials and/or showcase a sponsorship banner as you advise. We welcome your ideas!

Brief outline of program or event:
In honor of International Children´s Book Day, ALMA would like to organize two events, an author/illustrator panel discussion on April 2 and several multicultural arts & crafts workshops for youth (ages 4-18) with the same authors/illustrators and slated for the weekend of April 6-7, 2013. The panel would address the importance of international children´s books, how panelists are contributing to this effort, perceived needs of the Armenian-American community in this regard, trends in multicultural children´s book publishing, and the state of the book publishing industry as a whole. The authors/illustrators featured would be: Susan Pattie, Lucine Kasbarian, Alik Arzoumanian, and Juliet Davtian


Name: Karen Hildebrand (hildebka@gmail.com)

Institution: Ohio Library and Reading Consultant

Title of proposed program: Notable Books for a Global Society Award Winners

Audience: Children, Teachers, Parents

Books used:
Any or all of the award winners from 2012 or previous years of the Notable Books for a Global Society.

Materials needed:
Gather the lists from the website. Colored paper for making bookmarks or booklists. Paper purchased from teacher supply stores or catalogs in the shape of a globe are ideal.

Brief outline of program or event:
Have the display in a school or public library for children, teachers and parents to browse. Book talking these books to a staff meeting, professional development meeting or parent evening in the public library would give greater insight and hands-on experience with these excellent award-winning titles. Teachers and librarians can also book talk these titles in individual classrooms.


Name: Anne Pellowski (arpell6@aol.com)

Institution:

Title of proposed program: Riddles from around the world

Audience: School children of any age; public library programs

Books used:
Riddles in THE STORY VINE (Pellowski, Simon & Schuster); Riddles in FOLKTALES AND FOLKLORE OF MONGOLIA (Dashdondog Jamba, Libraries Unlimited); other titles in this series also include riddles; LAUGHING TOGETHER - BARBARA wALKER and many other true riddle books

Materials needed:
Books about the countries from which the students come, especially if there are any translated books, even adult books.

Brief outline of program or event:
For those schools, libraries or other agencies with a university in the community, approach the Foreign Students´ Office (or Adviser) and ask for volunteers from 3 0r 4 students from different countries (offer a small stipend if possible) to give a short summary of their favorite book when they were growing up in their country. If it was a translation of an internationally known book, have copies of those available. If it was a book known only nationally, see if they can either get a copy sent or at least get a few photos of pages and illustrations from the book sent by family and friends in their home countries.


Name: Anne Pellowski (arpell6@aol.com)

Institution:

Title of proposed program: My Favorite Book When Growing Up in ___

Audience: Public library program attendees, school classes or assemblies; classes in children´s literature at

Books used:
Depends on books cited by foreign students

Materials needed:
Books mentioned above, plus American riddle books

Brief outline of program or event:
Have the children/audience give any riddles they know of that use common objects or places as the answers. Compare the difference in riddling language and strategy when describing an egg, for example. My favorite riddle of all time and one I use frequently as an introduction to an African story program ( riddles are often used to open storytelling in Africa) is this one: "I pass the living, they are silent; I pass the dead, they speak to me." What are they? The answer: Leaves


Name: Anne Pellowski (arpell6@aol.com)

Institution:

Title of proposed program: My Favorite Book When Growing Up in ___

Audience: Public library program attendees, school classes or assemblies; classes in children´s literature at

Books used:
Depends on books cited by foreign students

Materials needed:
Books mentioned above, plus American riddle books

Brief outline of program or event:
Have the children/audience give any riddles they know of that use common objects or places as the answers. Compare the difference in riddling language and strategy when describing an egg, for example. My favorite riddle of all time and one I use frequently as an introduction to an African story program ( riddles are often used to open storytelling in Africa) is this one: "I pass the living, they are silent; I pass the dead, they speak to me." What are they? The answer: Leaves


Name: Julinda Abu Nasr (PhD) Honorary President of LBBY (julinasr@gmail.com)

Institution: Lebanese Board on Books for Young People (LBBY)

Title of proposed program: Activities for National Week for the Promotion of Reading

Audience: children and parents

Books used:
A variety of books

Materials needed:
Certificates, incentives and healthy snacks

Brief outline of program or event:
April 20-May 3, 2012 1. Reading sessions in different schools, public libraries and orphanages. This year stories will be read to deaf and blind children in their schools. 2. A number of TV appearances to talk about the importance of reading are planned. Some articles will be written for the local newspapers on the literary events of the week and their significance. International activities on children´s literature will be mentioned. (It is worth noting here that LBBY was responsible for introducing the Reading Week to the Ministry of Culture, the body that oversees the variety of activities that take place in the country at large. Schools, libraries, orphanages, publishers, writers, illustrators, the media .all take an active part in one way or another during this week. The whole country is involved in reading activities) 3. A celebration is held during which certificates and prizes are given to the top three readers in the 65 schools that are participating in LBBY Yearly Reading Competition. This celebration is usually attended by the winning students, the teachers who were responsible for the activity, the parents of the students and sometimes members from the Ministry of Culture. This year we have something very special for the celebration. We are taking the children to a natural resort where they will have a tour of the place with a guide who will introduce them to the many activities of the organization, the kinds of trees and shrubs in the forest there, the recycling done and others. A music program including some animation will take place. Children will be given presents, certificates for being good readers and a healthy snack prepared on the site. 4. Another activity of the week is A Panel Discussion on Books for Children with Special Needs. This is an area that is totally neglected in our country. We will have an exhibition of books written in Arabic for these children and about them for parents, teachers, social workers and others. 5. An E book will be launched by LBBY this year in cooperation with Lebanese Down Syndrome Association. It is our first attempt at this kind of books.


Name: Kathryn Erskine (kathy.erskine@me.com)

Institution:

Title of proposed program: Skype an Author!

Audience: 4th grade class in St. Louis, MO

Books used:
MOCKINGBIRD and a variety of others

Materials needed:
Voices and ideas!

Brief outline of program or event:
The class has ideas of how the story could be told from another character´s perspective. I´ll answer their questions and encourage them to continue being authors and write their own stories.


Name: Judi Moreillon (jmoreillon@twu.edu)

Institution: Texas Woman´s University

Title of proposed program: Celebrate International Children´s Book Day!

Audience: Middle School International Book Club students, preservice classroom teachers, and the TWU community

Books used:
A complete list is found on our wiki at: http://internationalchildrensbookday2012.pbworks.com/

Materials needed:
storytellers, contemporary international novels display, handout with wiki link for audience access after the event

Brief outline of program or event:
To celebrate International Children´s Book Day, graduate students and their professor in LS5633: The Art of Storytelling are sharing traditional stories from China, India, Ireland, Mexico, and Spain. In addition, we are providing contemporary international novels to browse. We used the Outstanding International Books (OIB) Lists from the U.S. Board on Books for Young People (USBBY) and the WOW (Worlds of Words) International Collection of Children´s and Adolescent Literature database to identify some of the contemporary novels. 8th-grade students in the Calhoun Middle School International Book Club, sponsored by English language arts teacher Ragina Shearer, and their parents will be among our audience. Ms. Shearer and Dr. Moreillon, assistant professor TWU, are Texas Ambassadors for the USBBY.


Name: Ragina Shearer (ragina.s@gmail.com)

Institution:

Title of proposed program: International Book Club

Audience: 8th grade students

Books used:
Where the Mountain Meets the Moon by Grace Lin, Tiger Moon by Antonia Michaelis, Heartsinger by Karlijn Stoffels, Here Lies Arthur by Philip Reeve

Materials needed:
Books, Computers

Brief outline of program or event:
Eighth grade students and I have formed an International Book Club. Here is a picture of us wearing our club T shirts. The students have been reading the four international titles, listed here, under materials for the past month. Now during the month of March they will be blogging with Texas Woman's University students on wowlit.org. In celebration of International Children´s Day, the students will be attending a storytelling celebration held at TWU.


Name: Constance Vidor (cvidor@friendsseminary.org)

Institution: Friends Seminary

Title of proposed program: Many Stories, Many Languages

Audience: K-4

Books used:
To be decided!

Materials needed:
Picture book versions of folk tales or fairy tales in languages other than English

Brief outline of program or event:
I am fortunate to work in a school that includes a number of families that speak in languages other than English. I´m recruiting parents to read aloud a folk tale or fairy tale in their language for an assembly to take place on or close to International Children´s Literature Day. I will scan the illustrations from each page of each book and project them onto a screen with a digital projector. Each parent will provide a brief summary of the story in English, then read it aloud in the original language while showing the illustrations. I will write back after the program with more details but wanted to share this now in case other people might like to copy this plan!


Name: Alison Francis (afrancis@laglib.org)

Institution: LaGrange Library

Title of proposed program: Family Story Time Celebrating International Children´s Book Day

Audience: Families with children ages 4 and up

Books used:
A selection of picture books from the forthcoming Outstanding International Books of 2011 list.

Materials needed:
Picture books from the 2011 list of Outstanding International Books

Brief outline of program or event:
Families will come to a story time for a reading of several picture books from the forthcoming 2011 list of international books for young children. Following the readings, families will share some of their own favorite stories from their family´s heritage. When families register for the event, they will be asked to bring a favorite dessert from their family´s heritage. After the books have been read and family stories shared, families will share their desserts and any stories related to the food they brought.


Name: Alison O'Reilly

Institution: Suffolk Cooperative Library System

Title of proposed program: A Child´s Day in...

Audience: the children in your home, children in a classroom

Books used:
Any of the "Child´s Day" series published by Benchmark Books, and reprinted by Frances Lincoln Publishers. Visit worldcat.org and search for the series "Child´s Day."

Materials needed:
Paper, markers or crayons. Also, a digital camera and printer (optional)

Brief outline of program or event:
In your home, read one of the Child´s Day series, such as "In an Indian Village" by Prodeepta Das. Talk about how life in your neighborhood is different and/or similar to life in Geeta´s community. Make your own book about what a day in your child´s life is like. Include photographs or drawings. In school, a classroom teacher or librarian could read this book to the class and then the students could make their books and bring them in for sharing. Taking it further, the books could be sent to a classroom in another country, and books could be requested from those students in return.


Name: Doris Gebel (dorisgebel@gmail.com)

Institution: Northport-East Northport Public Library

Title of proposed program: Bookshelf Collage

Audience: Children you know

Books used:
Books that children own

Materials needed:
Photographs of Children's Book Shelves

Brief outline of program or event:
Ask the children you work with to bring in a picture of their bookshelf to create a collage to hang in your classroom or library. Paper Tigers took this idea one step further and invited child from around the world to post pictures on their blog and called the project Around the World in 100 Book Shelves. Check it out


Name: Doris Gebel (dorisgebel@gmail.com)

Institution: Northport-East Northport Public Library

Title of proposed program: Discovering International Books

Audience: Educators

Books used:
Books reviewed by trustworthy sources

Materials needed:
Internet access

Brief outline of program or event:
Learn about trustworthy review sources for international books. Here are some to get started:
Outstanding International Books List USBBY selects an annual list of Outstanding International Books for children and young adults, which is published each year in the February issue of School Library Journal and as a bookmark.
PaperTigers reviews are written by us and have an international scope, to keep you up to date with what is being published around the rim.
Access Africa Africa Access Review is an online database that contains over 1000 annotations and reviews of children´s books written by university professors, librarians, and teachers and is the sponsor of the Children´s Africana Book Awards.


Name: Lisa Herskowitz (lherskow@suffolk.lib.ny.ys)

Institution: Northport-East Northport Public Library

Title of proposed program: Folktales from Around the World

Audience: grades 2-5

Books used:
STORIES TO SOLVE by Geroge Shannon MORE STORIES TO SOLVE STILL MORE STORIES TO SOLVE CULTUREGRAM

Materials needed:
pencil, paper, photocopies world map(optional) Smart Board (optional) country souvenirs (optional)

Brief outline of program or event:
The Stories to Solve series by George Shannon is a fun vehicle to introduce children to different countries. Each short folktale (average six paragraphs) ends with a word puzzle that challenges children to think outside of the box to solve a mystery. Indicate on a map the country of origin of the tale you are going to tell. Displaying hats, flags, or other items from the country adds another dimension, as would a Smart Board demonstration of appropriate websites or databases providing country facts. Share interesting gestures, social customs, eating habits, etc. obtained from CultureGrams. After the story is read aloud, the children, who have been split up into small groups, work together to solve each mystery. Provide each group with pencil, paper and a copy of the story. Some of the stories lend themselves to a visual solution. For those tales, make copies of the "answer" illustration from the book and cut each one into small squares. Give each group a set of squares to assemble to solve the puzzle.


Name: Lisa Herskowitz (lherskow@suffolk.lib.ny.ys)

Institution: Northport-East Northport Public Library

Title of proposed program: International Playground Games

Audience: ages 7-10

Books used:
CHILDREN´S PLAYGROUND GAMES FROM AROUND THE WORLD by Glenn Kirchner

Materials needed:
crepe paper streamers balls boxes

Brief outline of program or event:
Please refer to CHILDREN´S PLAYGROUND GAMES FROM AROUND THE WORLD by Glenn Kirchner for more detailed descriptions of these activities for groups of 16 or more children to be played in a large program room. Provide 2 colors of crepe paper streamers to create team arm bands. Have a display of folktales, nonfiction and fiction books that highlight the countries of origin of the games.

  1. KITCHEN BALL (pg. 43) from Botswana is a relay games that requires setting up two teams to pass a ball under the legs to the next player.
  2. The tossing game BALLS IN BOXES (pg. 111) from Jamaica needs a ball and a box (large enough to comfortably accommodate the ball) for each pair of children.
  3. Children pretend to play different musical instruments in the guessing game THE CONDUCTOR (pg. 133) from Romania.
  4. Children physically create geometric shapes as a group in the group guessing game from Argentina GEOMETRY CLASS (pg. 193).


Name: Shyamala Shanmugasundaram (shyamshaan@yahoo.co.in)

Institution: Author and event organizer

Title of proposed program: Neighbourhood Storybook Reading Festival

Audience: school aged children

Books used:
Materials needed:
children´s books

Brief outline of program or event:
Children´s author Shyamala Shanmugasundaram is co-organizing a one day conference on Indian children's books to be held in February in Mumbai, India. Under the Kahani Tree: a place to promote reading and children books Here is her suggestion to promote reading among children:

Conduct a two long neighbourhood storybook reading festival by partnering with a neighbourhood school or library to avoid the expenses involved in hiring a place and equipment. In this way you can reach out to a large number of children who love listening to stories. On the first day, a storyteller teaches the children the art of narrating stories- how to modulate voices for each character, high or low pitch, expressing feelings, etc. On the second day children take turns in reading out from their favourite storybooks. This helps to build self confidence and public speaking skills.

Prior to the day of the event, the organizers can arrange to bring talented resource people to the neighbourhood. Corporate companies can be given banner space and allowed to distribute promotional leaflets on the premises of the event in exchange of funds to hire the resource people.

Shyamala Shanmugasundaram
Navi Mumbai, India


Name: Kathy G. Short (shortk@u.arizona.edu)

Institution: University of Arizona

Title of proposed program: Travel the World through Books

Audience: Children, Parents, Teachers

Books used: Global literature by local authors, illustrators, and translators. Children's books in world languages. Display of the USBBY 2011 Outstanding International Books
Materials needed:
Passports to be stamped

Brief outline of program or event:
Open house from 9-12 on a Saturday morning where visitors can travel from place to place in our center to get their passports stamped as they - See the original drafts and illustrations and talk to 5 local authors, illustrators, and translators who have books in global setting. Can also purchase their books and get them signed. - International readers reading in 7 different languages from a display of children's books from those countries - Browse award-winning international books - Get bookmarks and book lists on global literature These will be set up in different stations throughout the center to facilitate informal interactions and the stamping of passports.


Name: Laurina Cashin (lcashin@welovechildrensbooks.com)

Institution:

Title of proposed program: El día de los niños/El día de los libros, Children´s Day/Book Day

Audience: Children and families

Books used: All books, but especially those that honor home languages and cultures, and thus promote bilingual and multilingual literacy, and global understanding through reading. See http://www.patmora.com/dia/nuggets/8bookjoy.htm for suggestions.
Materials needed:
dependent on programming; for programming ideas see http://www.patmora.com/dia/nuggets/3literacy.htm and http://www.patmora.com/dia/nuggets/9crafts.htm

Brief outline of program or event:
Día (El día de los niños/El día de los libros, Children´s Day/Book Day), a community-based family literacy initiative, is a daily commitment to link all children to books, languages and cultures. Culminating celebrations are usually held in libraries, schools and community centers in April. Día shares similar goals to International Children´s Book Day, and they naturally complement one another as literacy celebrations to plan for and enjoy every April. For more information visit Día's national home at ALA/ALSC (http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/alsc/initiatives/diadelosninos/index.cfm)and the website of Día´s founder, Pat Mora, (http://www.patmora.com/dia.htm .)


Name: Christine Farrugia (libraryhorse@yahoo.com)

Institution: Northport-East Northport Public Library, Long Island, New York

Title of proposed program: "Learning About Cultures Through Poetry"

Audience: Children in Graes 4-6 (can be adapted for older grade levels)

Books used: Laughing Tomatoes and Other Spring Poems by Francisco X. Alarcon Neighborhood Odes by Gary Soto A Suitcase of Seaweed and Other Poems by Janet S. Wong Yum! MmMm!Que Rico!: Americas´ Sproutings by Pat Mora
Materials needed:
Paper, pencils

Brief outline of program or event:
A brief introduction to poetry will be provided to the children, focusing on the descriptive nature of poems. A selection of poems from each book will be read aloud. The children will be instructed to write down significant words on paper as each poem is being read. They will encouraged to focus on words dealing with foods, names, customs, holidays, family members, etc., including words in languages other than English. Discussion will follow and the children will discover how much they can learn about other cultures through poetry. Participants can also take an opportunity to write a poem about their own culture/background.


Name: Cristy Burne (cj@cristyburne.com)

Institution:

Title of proposed program: Monsters of the world

Audience: Children of any age (tailoring scariness to suit)

Books used: Books that feature curious and fabulous monsters from around the world. For example: BUNYIPS DON´T by Sally Odgers features Australian monsters called bunyips; TALES OF THE TOKOLOSHE by Pieter Scholtz features the African tokoloshe; and THE TANIWHA OF WELLINGTON HARBOUR by Moira Wairama features the Maori taniwha.
Materials needed:
- Sheets of paper - Pens and pencils for drawing

Brief outline of program or event:
- Read books about some of the weird and wonderful monsters that exist in mythology from around the world. - Talk about some of the monsters that exist in Western/European mythology (for example, vampires, werewolves, etc) - Ask the kids to grab their pens and paper and dream up their own monster. Encourage them to create a monster that is specific to them. Draw the monster and label its attributes. Does it have strong legs for jumping mountains? Does it carry a cake for feeding its friends? Does it wear sunglasses to protect its eyes from the snow?


Name: Rebecca Levitsky (releedavis@yahoo.com)

Institution:

Title of proposed program: Postcards from around the world

Audience: 3-6 grade

Books used: Post Card Passages by Susan Joyce Encyclopedia Set
Materials needed:
Postcard templates Pencils Stickers Whiteboard and markers Display board for the completed postcards Children_around_the_world.jpg poster

Brief outline of program or event:
Subject Area: Information Literacy/Social Studies/ELA Grade Level: 3-6 (Ages 8-11)

Lesson Title: "Postcards from Around the World" Encyclopedia Lesson Time: 30 minutes

Information Literacy Standards: information literacy-to access information efficiently

Ask the students if they have ever sent or received a postcard. Read the book Post Card Passages by Susan Joyce to understand the concept of a post card and the information it usually contains. Ask them where they think we could get some information on a country and have the students use encyclopedias and other reference sources. Have students work with a partner to create postcards and send them to one another.


Name: Nicole Deming (nicole.deming@cbcbooks.org)

Institution: The Children´s Book Council

Title of proposed program: Vote for the Children´s Choice Book Awards!

Audience: Children and teens of all ages

Books used: Finalists are listed here: http://www.bookweekonline.com/finalists
Materials needed:
Up to you! See below!

Brief outline of program or event:
Give your young readers a powerful voice in their own reading choices and encourage them to vote for the Children´s Choice Book Awards! The Children´s Choice Book Awards is the only national book awards program where the winning titles are selected by children and teens of all ages. Voting is open now until April 29 at www.bookweekonline.com/voting! The CCBAs are a vital part of Children´s Book Week (May 2-8, 2011). Fantastic Book Week celebration ideas and resources are available here: http://www.bookweekonline.com/for-teachers
See how friends of Children´s Book Week are celebrating this year! http://www.bookweekonline.com/local


Name: Bianca Piergallini (bpiergallini@gmail.com)

Institution: Whitehall City Schools

Title of proposed program: "What's in a Name?"

Audience: Grades 6-8

Books used: Literature that addresses the theme of names/naming (preferably books that represent a variety of cultures around the world, e.g., Hannah is My Name (Yang), My Name is Bilal (Mobin-Uddin), My Name is Jorge (Medina), My Name Is Sangoel (Williams & Mohammed), My Name is Yoon (Recorvits), My Name Was Hussein (Kyuchukov), The Name Jar (Choi)
Materials needed:
Chart paper, markers

Before the Lesson: • Facilitate a discussion with students on the topic, “What is a Picture Book?” • Study the aesthetics of picture books (explain important features of these texts) • Show students how they “work” • Provide various examples of books for students to browse Procedures: • Assign students to small groups and give each group a choice of the picture book that they wish to read/analyze. • Ask students in each group to play a role: Reader (who will read the book aloud to the rest of the group), Writer (who will write the thoughts of the group on the chart paper), and Speaker (who will share the thoughts of the group with the rest of the class). • While students are reading their respective texts, post potential discussion questions on the board for them to address on their chart paper after reading. Some sample questions include: 1. Why was the character's name important to him or her? What actions/words showed the importance? 2. What conflict arose because of the character's name? How was the conflict resolved? 3. How would you have reacted to the conflict? 4. What cultural variations (differences from your own culture) did you identify in the text? Similarities? 5. What is the "story" of your name? • Have the speaker for each group share some of the main points of the group's discussion with the entire class. Encourage other students to build off of these points for a more in-depth discussion. Extension: There are several directions in which this lesson can continue, for example, a writing lesson (a personal narrative) can stem from the discussion of question #5 (What is the story of your name?). There is also a connection to Social Studies, where students can research the cultural history of their name.


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